Regional Cooperation, Conflicts and Constructiveness in South Asia: Strengthening SAARC - International Interdisciplinary Conference

Country: India

City: Margao

Abstr. due: 15.09.2015

Dates: 21.01.16 — 23.01.16

Area Of Sciences: Political science;

Organizing comittee e-mail: rcccsa@chowgules.ac.in

Organizers: Parvatibai Chowgule College of Arts & Science

 

South Asia, a composite of eight countries, is knitted historically, socio-culturally and economically. It represents diversity in human development, resource enhancement and socio-economic welfare. The region with 3.8 per cent of the world’s geographical area, supports nearly one fourth of the world’s populace. But in the context of Human Development Index, in South Asia, Maldives and Bangladesh show dismal figures which are as low as 77 and 132 ranks respectively. Even the Human Poverty Index of Nepal and Afghanistan show discouraging figures. In fact, one billion of the world’s 2.5 billion poor reside in South Asia. The Global Employment Trend 2013, states that youth employment rate in South Asia is 9.8 per cent, which is significantly higher than global figure of 3.8 per cent.

However, South Asia shows promises for the future. The current labor pool which is 1.8 billion, is expected to increase to 3.1 billion by 2025. Its “demographic dividend” will increase enormously as 60 per cent of its population is below 30 years. Further, 14 per cent of the world’s urban population resides in this region and three-fourths of South Asia’s economic growth is led by cities. From the present level of 31 per cent urbanization, it is expected that 50 per cent of South Asia’s population will reside in cities, especially, megacities in the next 20 years.

The region has bountiful human and natural resources. But, there are several barriers within the region which restrict their optimum utility and promotion of growth at different scales. The removal of these barriers, optimum and judicious use of all resources will surely help the region in a big way.

Further, various issues like bilateral trade, sharing of river water, border disputes and border lands encroachment, cross border mobility of human resources, terrorism, illegal trade, political grievances amongst neighbors, power polarization and third party intervention that affects regional power balance, have put the regions on an edge of high Indo-centric discontent amongst neighbors.

South Asian developmental issues can be dealt in a better manner, by sharing human resources. Therefore inviting regional issues under discourse and coming up with some viable strategies is the need of the hour.

This calls upon to address certain issues of South Asia that would foster inclusive growth, environmental protection, democratic governance, social welfare, poverty alleviation and regional development. The conference would enable researchers, planners, academicians and social workers to put forth their views on South Asia’s promotion and growth as a region of global importance.

 

Conference Web-Site: http://chowgulegeographers.com/int_conf_2016_hm/