Phonetic Structures of Indigenous Languages of South America

Country: Australia

City: Melbourne

Abstr. due: 04.12.2018

Dates: 05.08.19 — 09.08.19

Area Of Sciences: Humanities;

Organizing comittee e-mail: m.kohlberger AT hum.leidenuniv.nl

Organizers: ASSTA

 

This is a special session of the International Congress of Phonetic Sciences where researchers can present the most up-to-date phonetic research on endangered South American Indigenous languages. In particular, the session focuses on how researching phonetic structures in native South American languages can inform and enrich phonetic typology as a whole. Furthermore, this session offers a possibility for field phoneticians working on endangered languages to exchange methodological insights given that mainstream practices for collecting phonetic data may not be possible in the small remote communities where many endangered languages are spoken.

Call for Papers: 

The 19th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences (ICPhS 19) will take place in Melbourne, Australia on 5-9 August 2019, with “Endangered Languages” as one of the themes of the conference. We are delighted to announce that there will be a special session at the Congress devoted to the phonetic structures of Indigenous languages of South America. We are now inviting full paper submissions on original, unpublished research relating to the phonetics of any Indigenous South American language. The special session will be a poster session, but all successful submissions will be immediately published as part of the prestigious ICPhS proceedings. 

This special session is a venue for researchers to present the most up-to-date phonetic research on endangered South American Indigenous languages. In particular, the session focuses on how researching phonetic structures in native South American languages can inform and enrich phonetic typology as a whole. Furthermore, this session offers a possibility for field phoneticians working on endangered languages to exchange methodological insights given that mainstream practices for collecting phonetic data may not be possible in the small remote communities where many endangered languages are spoken. 

Conference Web-Site: https://linguistlist.org/issues/29/29-3412.html