Environment, Space, and Place Working Group: Cultural Studies Association

Страна: США

Город: Philadelphia

Тезисы до: 01.02.2016

Даты: 02.06.16 — 06.06.16

Область наук: Культурология;

Е-мейл Оргкомитета: danielgustavanderson@yahoo.com

Организаторы: Cultural Studies Association

 

For the 2016 Cultural Studies Association Conference (June 2-5 2016, Villanova University, Philadelphia, PA), the Environment, Space, and Place (ESP) Working Group seeks proposals for the following six clusters:

1) Whither Ecocriticism? Re-theorizing the intersection of critical theory and ecological discourses
Moderator: Daniel Gustav Anderson

In the humanities, the intersection of cultural analysis and environmental concern irrupted in the U.S. through the discourse of ecocriticism, which has, for three decades, largely intervened by explicating a selected canon of nature writing, mining texts for ecological insights and plumbing their bioregional sensitivity, or offering “green readings” of given cultural formations—most typically but not exclusively literary ones. Ecocriticism has been challenged by scholars for being inadequately theorized, diffuse in purpose, and contradicting its environmental-activist aspirations with its adherence to the disciplinary imperative to literary analysis. Alternative discourses, such as the environmental humanities, have emerged, challenging and arguably displacing ecocriticism’s centrality as a means to articulate the intersection of culture and environment to inform a transformational politics.

This panel invites papers that assess aspects of this conjuncture broadly defined: How can the point of contact between ecological discourse and critical theory best be articulated now, with the objective of imagining an alternative to capitalist social and ecological relations, and given the bodies of thought already at hand?

Proposals should be submitted by February 1, 2016, to include:

a. Your name, email address, department, and institutional affiliation.
b. A 300-word (or less) abstract for your 15-20 minute project presentation, including a title.
c. Audio-visual equipment needs (no requests for AV equipment can be honored later).

Please send all required information to Daniel Gustav Anderson (danielgustavanderson@yahoo.com) and Daniel Lanza Rivers (daniellanzarivers@gmail.com).

2) Environment, Justice, and Injustice

This panel will consider the production and reproduction of injustice through lived environment: the injustice of socialized risk and loss as a necessary term of privatized profit, and the contestation of the same.

Activism—direct action, community-organized, creative, and non-profit driven—is undoubtedly central to achieving justice for human and nonhuman populations, objects, and environments that are subject to “slow violence.” Rob Nixon defines this term as “violence that occurs gradually and out of site, a violence of delayed destruction that is dispersed across space and time, an attritional violence that is not typically viewed as violence at all” (Nixon 2011, 2). Proximity to toxic sites, air, and water pollution; the effects of extreme climates and resource wars; deindustrialization and deurbanization of cities; and the results of capitalist expansion and deindustrialization: these hazardous conditions affect the marginalized, (post)colonized, and poor populations very differently from those with the means to avoid them. Further, the interconnections of social and ecological crises demands consideration of the parallel suffering of animal life, and the potential for concepts such as “eco-justice” as means to contestation of that suffering. This panel will probe the production and reproduction of injustice through lived environment, exploring socialized risk and loss as a necessary term of privatized profit, as well as the activist solutions to these problems of slow violence.

Proposals should be submitted by February 1, 2016, to include:

a. Your name, email address, department, and institutional affiliation.
b. A 300-word (or less) abstract for your 15-20 minute project presentation, including a title.
c. Audio-visual equipment needs (no requests for AV equipment can be honored later).

Please send all required information to Daniel Gustav Anderson (danielgustavanderson@yahoo.com) and Daniel Lanza Rivers (daniellanzarivers@gmail.com).

3) Trash, Waste, and Consequences

Waste connotes trash, pollution, or an undesirable and even toxic surplus: the crisis of overproduced commodities, of accumulating byproducts of production, and the leftovers and detritus of consumption and overproduction. This panel invites papers that consider the logic behind waste, the production of the production of waste thus defined, and its consequences. How does living with waste limit social being, and what does it make possible? Topics may include the spatiality and materiality of waste—built spaces now abandoned or made unlivable (urban ruins, industrial disaster sites, trash dumps); the afterlives of waste materials as use value or as impediments to living; alternative forms of productivity, creativity, and sociality made possible or necessary by living with waste; or the diminution of labor, of productive forces, due to waste’s role as friction in the production process insofar as poisoned, asthmatic, and undernourished laborers negotiating urban zones that are in many senses already wasted present a challenge to the realization of profit.

Proposals should be submitted by February 1, 2016, to include:

a. Your name, email address, department, and institutional affiliation.
b. A 300-word (or less) abstract for your 15-20 minute project presentation, including a title.
c. Audio-visual equipment needs (no requests for AV equipment can be honored later).

Please send all required information to Daniel Gustav Anderson (danielgustavanderson@yahoo.com) and Daniel Lanza Rivers (daniellanzarivers@gmail.com).

4) Material Creatures
Moderator: Daniel Lanza Rivers

This panel invites proposals for presentations that examine the material lives of animals in relation to space, time, climate, and culture/s broadly defined. We are particularly interested in projects that reach beyond discussions of the ontological and universalized “animal” to interrogate specific species, lives, habitats, and violences that play out in time and space. Potential panels could address real estate encroachment, interspecial interactions, animal-based industries, or material animals who have gained historical or cultural notoriety, such as Dolly the sheep, Lonesome George the Pinta Island tortoise, Gertrude Stein’s pet dog(s) Basket, or Cecil the lion. We’re especially interested in explorations that pay particular attention to the clash between animal lives, commercial interests, anthropocentric habitus, and human negotiations of gender, race, class, migration, sexuality, and/or belonging.

Proposals should be submitted by February 1, 2016, to include:

a. Your name, email address, department, and institutional affiliation.
b. A 300-word (or less) abstract for your 15-20 minute project presentation, including a title.
c. Audio-visual equipment needs (no requests for AV equipment can be honored later).

Please send all required information to Daniel Gustav Anderson (danielgustavanderson@yahoo.com) and Daniel Lanza Rivers (daniellanzarivers@gmail.com).

5) Documenting the Crisis, Containing the Crisis

The Environment, Space, and Place Working Group seeks proposals for presentations that analyze the representation of contemporary environmental crises in literature, film, television, video games, and social media. We welcome proposals on cultural objects that document the crisis and forms of resistance to it. We also seek proposals addressing the containment of the crisis in contemporary culture, whereby appeals to environmental awareness are reabsorbed into anti-environmental practices, as in the “greenwashing” of consumer goods, or the urgency of the crisis is attenuated in public discourse, as exemplified by ideologies of climate change denial. Overall, this panel’s purpose is to account for the cultural documentation and containment of contemporary environmental crisis.

Proposals should be submitted by February 1, 2016, to include:

a. Your name, email address, department, and institutional affiliation.
b. A 300-word (or less) abstract for your 15-20 minute project presentation, including a title.
c. Audio-visual equipment needs (no requests for AV equipment can be honored later).

Please send all required information to Daniel Gustav Anderson (danielgustavanderson@yahoo.com) and Daniel Lanza Rivers (daniellanzarivers@gmail.com).

6) Roundtable on Methodology: Practices in Environmental Cultural Studies
Moderator: Sophie Moore, UC Davis

In this roundtable session, the Environment, Space and Place working group seeks to open a dialogue on methodology in environmental cultural studies. In this session, we hope to launch a discussion of what practices we use to think through the entanglement of nature, culture, and power, exploring the inter- or un-disciplinary methodologies that have been germinal in cultural studies, and examining how we enrich those traditions with practices drawn from across the humanities and social sciences. We invite participants to explore what an “undisciplined” study of nature, broadly conceived, offers to cultural studies in all its methodological diversity, and, in turn, how the genealogy of cultural studies enriches the interdisciplinary study of nature-society relations. We welcome both papers that are explicitly aligned with cultural studies as such, and those that affiliate with cultural studies through other interdisciplinary approaches like political ecology, ecocriticism, posthumanism, and eco-materialism, among others.

Веб-сайт конференции: http://www.asle.org/calls-for-papers/environment-space-and-place-working-group-cultural-studies-association/